Gibson potentiometer dating

Rated 3.97/5 based on 905 customer reviews

This should never be the only method used, but quite often it can help back up evidence already acquired to date an instrument. First you need to get underneath, to the circular disc on the bottom of the shaft at the opposite end of the knob (which may, or may not, have to be removed depending on the instrument).In most cases if it’s not made unreadable by blobs of solder, you should see a six or seven digit number.I was told to check the potentiometer date codes, which all have “1377142” impressed into them.I read on a Gibson forum that, on seven-digit pot codes, the fourth and fifth numbers represent the date.We’re not talking about dinner and a movie, of course…For my first blog post on dating instruments, I’d thought I’d talk about potentiometer or, “Pot” codes which can be used to help date almost all electric instruments, amplifiers, and effects pedals made in the U. The Pots are the small parts responsible for the volume and tone controls.Can you tell me what model this is and how much it is worth today? —Brian Page Left: The mystery ’70s Gibson Les Paul.Upper Right: Starting in 1970, Gibson began stamping “Made in USA” on the back of the headstock.

The serial number is 676323, and “Made in USA” is stamped below that.

I’ll start with trying to date the instrument, but keep in mind that dating and identifying Gibson guitars typically go hand in hand.

I get several questions about Gibson serial numbers every day, and my initial answer is always to not expect or rely on the serial number alone to determine the year of manufacture.

This means that if you don’t have a basic ballpark of the period an instrument was made prior to the 1960’s then Pot codes won’t really help you.

For example, the Pot codes you can make out are: 1377415.

Leave a Reply